View of Whiteplains Plantation

View of Whiteplains Plantation
Over Head View - Taken May 8, 2011 Photo By: Phil Rainwater

Friday, September 09, 2016

Old dog, new trick: Transponder use on the airport surface

 August 25, 2016

Mike Yodice
  • Director of Legal Service Plans at Yodice Associates
  • Counsels Legal Services Plan/Pilot Protection Services members on FAA compliance and enforcement
  • Regularly flies a Piper J-3 Cub and a Cherokee 180
By now, many of you have heard or read that the FAA and air traffic control want us to ensure that our transponders are on and in the altitude reporting mode while operating on movement areas at all airports. If you’re like me and sometimes slow to adapt to change, particularly when it involves ingrained flying habits and procedures, it may take some getting used to. In the meantime, at least for most of us, noncompliance shouldn’t be an issue that leads to FAA enforcement.
If you learned to fly more than a few years ago, you were probably taught to turn your transponder on just prior to takeoff and to turn it off (or to standby) after landing and taxiing off the runway, whether at a towered or nontowered field. For many years this was the practice as promoted in the Aeronautical Information Manual (AIM). The language in the AIM changed in 2012, 2014, and then again in 2016. In the current chapter 4 of the AIM, it now reads “Civil and military aircraft should operate with the transponder in the altitude reporting mode and ADS-B Out transmissions enabled (if equipped) at all airports, any time the aircraft is positioned on any portion of the airport movement area.” It goes on to relate certain other details, but the basic takeaway is that ATC now wants the transponder on for all operations in movement areas, i.e. at airports with operating control towers.
The change is associated with the transition to the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) and includes the coordination of Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) and Airport Surface Surveillance Capability (ASSC). The effectiveness of the system relies on participation. More and more aircraft equipped with ADS-B Out are coming out and according to the FAA website, the ASSC system is installed at 35 major airports. Why then does the FAA want the transponder on at all towered airports, even the ones without ASSC? For enhanced safety where transponders are readable, and I guess they want to re-train us in advance of the 2020 mandate.
So will you get into trouble for noncompliance—forgetting to turn on or off your transponder? For most of us, the answer is no. It’s not required if you’re not ADS-B Out equipped as the AIM guidance is nonregulatory. If you have ADS-B Out equipment installed, however, 14 CFR 91.225(f) requires that your transponder must be in transmit mode at all times. And, if ATC asks you to turn on or off your transponder, whether ADS-B equipped or not, you should comply—compliance with ATC operational instructions is required in accordance with 14 CFR 91.123(b).
I am still adjusting to the change and I sometimes revert to old habits by turning the transponder off and on at the wrong times. So far, neither the controllers at my home airport, Frederick Municipal Airport (no radar), nor the controllers at Potomac Approach seem to notice, or care, when my transponder is in the wrong mode while on the airport movement area in my non-ADS-B-equipped aircraft.

Link to AOPA; http://pilot-protection-services.aopa.org/News/2016/August/Old-Dogutm_source=ePilot&utm_medium=Content&utm_content=sap&utm_campaign=160908epilot#.V9Lc_uRH2p0.blogger

Monday, August 15, 2016

Homer Keisler - My Flying Experiences USAF



Homer asked me to share some of his Flying Experiences while in the Air Force. Below is a sample of some interesting stories from his past.  If you like them, make a comment and I'll post more as he gives them to me.















FIS-B advisory service adding data, curtailing older notams

U[date:

FIS-B advisory service adding data, curtailing older notams: AOPA is working with the FAA to make pilots aware of new weather products that will become available on the Flight Information Service-Broadcast (FIS-B) beginning next year. Pilots also should note new limitations in the delivery of notices to airmen that will take effect in September.

Wednesday, July 13, 2016

FAA Medical Bill Goes To President Desk For Signing

“This is the most significant legislative victory for general aviation in decades,” said AOPA President Mark Baker. “These reforms will provide relief to hundreds of thousands of pilots from an outdated, costly, and unnecessarily burdensome system. This legislation will strengthen the private pilot-private physician relationship and improve awareness of medical issues throughout our community. It will help pilots save time, money, and frustration.”



Medical Reform Highlights

Aircraft Specifications - Up to 6 seats, up to 6,000 lbs (no limitations on horsepower, number of engines, or gear type)
Flight Rules - Day and night VFR and IFR
Passengers - Up to 5 passengers
Aeromedical Training - Pilots must take a free online course every 2 years
Altitude Restrictions - Up to 18,000 feet msl
Speed limitation - 250 knots indicated airspeed
Pilot limitation - Cannot operate for compensation or hire

For the full story click on the link below.
Baker message

Tuesday, June 07, 2016

General Aviation ADS-B Rebate Program


Starting this Fall, the FAA is offering a monetary incentive to help owners of less-expensive general aviation aircraft equip with the required avionics that comply with the ADS-B Out rule that will take effect Jan. 1, 2020. The agency will offer a $500 rebate to eligible aircraft owners.
Are you eligible for a rebate?
ADS-B Rebate eligibility requirements infographic
Eligible aircraft: Defined as U.S.-registered, fixed-wing, single-engine piston aircraft, first registered before Jan 1, 2016.
Eligible equipment: Avionics that are certified to FAA Technical Standard Orders and meet the program rules (software upgrades of existing equipment are not eligible). Rebates are not available for aircraft already equipped with rule compliant ADS-B or for aircraft the FAA has previously paid or committed to pay for upgrade(s) to meet the ADS-B mandate.
Start the Rebate process now by doing the following:
  • Validate: Review and validate the aircraft owner information and aircraft-specific information contained within the Civil Aircraft Registry. The FAA will determine rebate program eligibility using the information in the Civil Aircraft Registry, and all rebates will be mailed to the aircraft owner as recorded in the registry. Visit the FAA Registry.
  • Research: Go to the Equip ADS-B website to research eligible equipment. This website includes additional information about ADS-B mandate airspace.
  • Plan: Locate a certified installation location, if required, and determine the specific aircraft requirements to ensure the installation is performed in accordance with applicable FAA regulations and meets the requirements identified in the General Aviation ADS-B Rebate Program Rules. While you may purchase the equipment now, your installation must occur after the program website is opened to rebate reservations to qualify for the rebate. The anticipated timeframe is estimated as Fall 2016.
Preview the ADS-B Rebate Process with our infographic (PDF).
Have questions? Get answers from our ADS-B Rebate Frequently Asked Questions.


Save $500 on ADS-B This Fall From FAA

General Aviation ADS-B Rebate Program

Starting this Fall, the FAA is offering a monetary incentive to help owners of less-expensive general aviation aircraft equip with the required avionics that comply with the ADS-B Out rule that will take effect Jan. 1, 2020. The agency will offer a $500 rebate to eligible aircraft owners.
Are you eligible for a rebate?
ADS-B Rebate eligibility requirements infographic
Eligible aircraft: Defined as U.S.-registered, fixed-wing, single-engine piston aircraft, first registered before Jan 1, 2016.
Eligible equipment: Avionics that are certified to FAA Technical Standard Orders and meet the program rules (software upgrades of existing equipment are not eligible). Rebates are not available for aircraft already equipped with rule compliant ADS-B or for aircraft the FAA has previously paid or committed to pay for upgrade(s) to meet the ADS-B mandate.
Start the Rebate process now by doing the following:
  • Validate: Review and validate the aircraft owner information and aircraft-specific information contained within the Civil Aircraft Registry. The FAA will determine rebate program eligibility using the information in the Civil Aircraft Registry, and all rebates will be mailed to the aircraft owner as recorded in the registry. Visit the FAA Registry.
  • Research: Go to the Equip ADS-B website to research eligible equipment. This website includes additional information about ADS-B mandate airspace.
  • Plan: Locate a certified installation location, if required, and determine the specific aircraft requirements to ensure the installation is performed in accordance with applicable FAA regulations and meets the requirements identified in the General Aviation ADS-B Rebate Program Rules. While you may purchase the equipment now, your installation must occur after the program website is opened to rebate reservations to qualify for the rebate. The anticipated timeframe is estimated as Fall 2016.
Preview the ADS-B Rebate Process with our infographic (PDF).
Have questions? Get answers from our ADS-B Rebate Frequently Asked Questions.